Another database: ProQuest Education

Table demonstrating order of search strings and their development.
Table demonstrating order of search strings and their development.

Research question: How can the library facilitate inquiry learning?

By the time I arrived at ProQuest, I was already feeling quite confident about the resources I had already found, particularly what A+ Education gave me as it was specific to the Australian education system. As a result, my searching in ProQuest was quite short. I put in my standard search first, (“Inquiry learning” OR “guided inquiry” OR “inquiry based learning”) AND (librarian OR library) AND (“secondary school” OR “high school”), which generated 1,470 results. While it said it was sorted by relevance, the first page did not strike me as relevant. The results were about inquiry learning in general, rather than in the library (Fig. 1). In fact, only one article piqued my interest – ‘DEWEY do Dewey don’t: a sign of the times’ (Gordon, 2013) – because it was the only one that focused on the role of the librarian.

Figure 1 First search using my default search string yielded a largely irrelevant list of results.
Figure 1 First search using my default search string yielded a largely irrelevant list of results.

Research question: How can inquiry learning be included in the English classroom?

My next search was about English – (“Inquiry learning” OR “guided inquiry” OR “inquiry based learning”) AND (librarian OR library) AND (“secondary school” OR “high school”) AND (english OR language) NOT (science OR biology). I automatically made the search string not include science and biology as they were already coming up in my previous search. This generated a list of results about using ICT in the classroom, or inquiry projects involving subjects that were not listed, so relevance was limited. I was able to find one article that followed an American English teacher’s journey into making research projects more interesting for her students using inquiry learning, ‘Motivating Students’ Research Skills and Interests through a Multimodal, Multigenre Research Project’ (Bailey, N. & Carroll, K. 2010). This will be helpful as until now I have found no academic literature that is about inquiry learning in English.

Aside from the Bailey and Carroll (2010) article about including inquiry learning in English, overall, ProQuest was largely a disappointment. It returned a large list of results that I would expect from Google or Google Scholar, but they did not have the same relevance as Google or A+ Education did.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s